Astronomical dating of mahabharata


Another major issue of how did observers of the period define and determine period between eclipses when no clocks existed, has been addressed.Eclipses Lunar eclipse occurs when Earth’s shadow falls on the Moon. Lunar eclipses can occur only at full moon, and can be either total or partial. Total lunar eclipses can last up to 2 hours, while partial lunar eclipses can last up to 4 hours.Then there is this clear reference to pair of eclipses occurring on 13th day as shown below.Fourteenth day, Fifteenth day and in past sixteenth day, but I have never known the Amavasya(New Moon day) to occur on the thirteenth day.Surya Siddhanta [Ref 2], a document evolved from roughly same period, states that sun was 54 degrees away from vernal equinox when Kaliyuga started on a new moon day, corresponding to February 17/18, 3102 BCJ, at Ujjain (75deg47min E 23deg 15min N). However it may be noted that it has been accepted as a Fact of History and not a legend.



Mahabharata Drona Parva also refers to Jayadhratha’s killing during a dark episode on 13th day of the war, which some consider as another short solar eclipse.Surya Siddhanta [Ref 2], a document evolved from roughly same period, states that sun was 54 degrees away from vernal equinox when Kaliyuga started on a new moon day, corresponding to February 17/18, 3102 BCJ, at Ujjain (75deg47min E 23deg 15min N).Varaha Mihira (circa 560 AD), another famous astronomer, stated that 2526 years before start of Saka count (either Shalivahana saka starting in 79 AD or Vikrama Saka starting in 57 BC) [Brihat Samhita Ref-3].This document is basically concerned with analysis of all eclipses visible at Kurukshethra(Location where Mahabharata war took place, north of New Delhi, Longitude 76 deg 49 min East, Latitude 29 deg 59 Min North) from 3300 BC to about Buddha-Mahavira-Parshvanaathatime of about 700BC.

Analysis of the time between successive eclipses, specifically time between end of one and beginning of other has been made, with a view to look at astronomical feasibility of back-to-back eclipses in 13 days, using modern astronomical computer software.

Lunar eclipse followed by solar eclipse on thirteenth day is in a single lunar month etc…