Dating in honduras


Tawahka is a Macro-Chibchan language that is very closely related to Sumo, which is spoken in Nicaragua. Misquito is a Macro-Chibchan language, although most Misquitos speak fluent Spanish.The Misquito population is about thirty-four thousand.Some are of African descent, and some of British descent. Although originally imposed by the conquistadores, it has been widely spoken in Honduras for over two hundred years.The Bay Islanders population is about twenty-two thousand. Almost all residents speak Spanish, although some also speak English or one of the Native American languages discussed in the previous paragraph. Hondurans use some words that are not heard in other Spanish-speaking countries, and this gives their speech a distinctive character. In spite of the 1969 war with El Salvador and tense relations with Nicaragua, the Honduran people feel that they are part of a larger Central American community.All these people self-identify as Hondurans, however.



The Miskito and Tawahka people live in the rain forests of the eastern lowlands, and in similar lands in neighboring areas of Nicaragua.Only those in Montaña de la Flor still speak the Tol (Jicaque) language, which is in the Hokan family.The Jicaque group in Yoro is much larger and has been almost completely assimilated into the national culture.The north coast was once primarily rain forest, but much of it has been cleared for commercial banana plantations. It includes the "Mosquito Coast," which is actually a long series of white sand beaches and freshwater lagoons.

Inland from the coast, the Mosquitia has one of the last great stands of tropical rain forest left in North America, plus pine woods and grasslands.

It completely fills a small, deep valley in the headwaters of the Choluteca River, in the central highlands. The major ethnic group include the Chortí, a native people with a population of about five thousand in the department of Copán.