Quitting dating sites


Put simply, my dating life was guided less by the question, "why? " I stopped dating when I realized that "why not" is not a good enough reason to be in a relationship.It's a great reason to buy an electric toothbrush or a doggy sweater, but not so great for life-altering decisions (unless your teeth are rapidly decaying or your dog is hypothermic).I first created an OKCupid account in 2011, and for nearly five years, online dating and I had a tumultuous, on-and-off relationship.Then, in December of 2015, I decided I would take a break from online dating—and that unlike my previous "breaks," this one would last for more than a few weeks.As with Twitter, Facebook, Linked In, and email, I checked it compulsively with the hope that some exciting notification would greet me on the homepage. I also realized that when I used Tinder, I was swiping compulsively to try to find out who my "super likes" were, often not even reading profiles.I wasn't even messaging the people I matched with—I just wanted the ego boost of getting a match.



At least right now, relationships are more risky and time consuming than they're worth. When I'm out and about and I spot a couple walking a dog or doing cuddling in the park, I feel a pang of jealousy.Back when FOMO was keeping me glued to my apps, I wish someone had reassured me other prospects would come my way if I looked up for a second.2.Online dating is addictive Right after I decided to stop going on OKCupid, I actually had to stop my hands from typing the "o" into my browser when I wanted a work break (OK I slipped up a few times, I'll admit it).It's actually ended up lasting a year because after seven months, I met someone—and it was IRL.

The biggest reason I had for deleting my dating apps was just an insufficient return on investment.

Whether because we didn't have much in common or we weren't willing to put in much effort, my conversations rarely left the texting stage.