Updating an old concrete carport


Paint: After checking out other Craftsman houses in the area, Aaron settled on a muted mustard hue—"it was different from my neighbors, but not too different"—accented by white trim and a barn-red door.Siding: In addition to finding wood clapboards and shingles under the beat-up aluminum, Aaron discovered remnants of Craftsman-style trim work above the windows and porch.We've all been taught that it's what's on the inside that counts; but when it comes to your home, the outside is certainly just as important.A drab exterior can make you cringe every time you approach the front door, while a handsome, thoughtfully designed one can turn the experience into a true pleasure.Entry: By bringing the gable roofline forward about 10 feet (flush with the existing facade) and adding a porch, they softened the division between the house and the street.Simple porch posts and railings that angle toward the walkway help give the space dimension.Under the porch, he knocked out old brick and put in new lattice to provide ventilation.



Shown: This house's old aluminum siding earned the owner $250 at a recycling center.Paint: A beachy combination of vibrant turquoise, aqua, and white invigorates the front and evokes the area's history as a resort town.Landscaping: Once a flat expanse of dying grass, the yard now features perennial beds and small shrubs, and is anchored by a walkway constructed from pavers that they got for free from a friend.Shown: Nailed-together board-and-batten shutters cost only a few bucks each to make.

Eleven years ago, when Aaron Stern bought this early-1900s home in Colorado Springs, Colorado, it boasted tons of traditional Craftsman features—not that you'd ever notice, thanks to the monotone paint scheme.

New glass and frames freshen up the eyebrow dormers and help protect against drafts.